Saturday, October 24, 2020

Vintage 1960s Holiday Treats Wacky Cake



This vintage recipe was born out of the shortages during the war. Bakers had to make do with what was available. This eggless cake was born out of ingenuity!

 

Wacky Cake

 

1 1/2 cup all-purpose flour

1 cup white sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

6 tablespoons canola oil

1 tablespoon white vinegar

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 cup cold water

powdered sugar

 

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. In an 8-inch square baking pan, whisk together the flour, sugar, salt, baking soda and cocoa.

     Use a spoon to make three wells in the dry ingredients, one large well, and two smaller wells. Pour the oil into the largest well, the vinegar into one of the smaller wells, and the vanilla into the last well. Pour the cold water over the top of everything and stir it all together with a fork.

     Immediately transfer pan to the oven and bake for 30 to 35 minutes.

    Remove cake to a wire rack to cool. When cooled, cut into squares and sift powdered sugar over the top.

 

Serves 12

Saturday, October 17, 2020

Vintage 1960s Holiday Treats Mash Potato Brownies



Mash Potato Brownies

 

⅔ cup instant mashed potato flakes

⅔ cup hot water

⅓ cup shortening

2 ounces unsweetened chocolate

1 cup of sugar

2 eggs

⅓ cup flour

½ teaspoon salt

½ baking powder

  ½ cup chopped nut

 

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Grease an 8x8 pan.

Measure potato flakes into the mixing bowl. Blend in hot water; set aside.

Melt shortening and chocolate over low heat, stirring constantly. Add chocolate mixture, sugar, and eggs to potatoes in a bowl.

Stir together remaining ingredients; blend into chocolate mixture. Pour into prepared pan. Bake 25 to 30 minutes. Cool before cutting

 

Makes 24 brownies

Tuesday, October 13, 2020

Vintage 1960s Holiday Treats, Fruit Cocktail Cake

 


This was my grandmother's favorite cake to make for holidays, birthdays, anniversaries, graduations...you name it. One of my favorite "Grandma's" bake.

 

Fruit Cocktail Cake

 

1-1/2 cups sugar

2 large eggs are beaten

1 15.5oz can fruit cocktail in heavy syrup (do not drain)

1 tsp salt

2 tsp baking soda

2 cups all-purpose flour

1/4 cup light brown sugar

1/2 cups coconut

 

Icing

3/4 cup sugar

1/2 cup evaporated milk

1 tsp vanilla extract

1/2 cup coconut

3-4 cup chopped pecans or walnuts

1 stick real butter

 

Sift all dry ingredients together, then add beaten eggs and fruit cocktail with liquid. Mix together. Pour into a 9x13 inch pan that has been greased and floured or sprayed with non-stick spray. Sprinkle cake batter with brown sugar and coconut. Bake at 350F for about 30-35 minutes until a toothpick tests clean.


Let cake cook for about 30 minutes. while the cake is cooling make the icing. Put butter, sugar, and milk in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Boil about  2 minutes. Remove from heat, add vanilla extract, coconut, and nuts. Mix and spread on cooled cake. After cake and icing is totally cooled, cover with foil or if your cake pan has a cover use it. This cake is best if made a day or two before serving. It also travels well.

 

 Serves 16-20

 

Note:  You can add 1/4 cups of chopped maraschino cherries to the batter, be sure to cut them in half or quarters.

 

Sunday, October 4, 2020

Vintage 1960s Food Fruit Bars


 

Fruit Bars

 

3/4 cup sifted flour                          1/4 cup melted shortening

1/2 tsp baking powder                    2 eggs, well - beaten

1/2 tsp salt                                       1 cup chopped nuts

1 cup brown sugar                          1 cup chopped pitted

    firmly packed                                  Dates

Set oven for moderate, 3250F. Grease a 9-inch square pan.

Sift together flour, baking powder, and salt, add sugar, mix well. Combine shortening and eggs, stir into dry ingredients and blend well. Stir in nuts and dates. Turn into greased pan and bake 30 minutes or til browned. Cut into bars while hot. Makes about 16 bars.

 

Mincemeat Squares:  Set oven for hot, 400F. Grease a 9-inch square pan. combine 1 cup firmly packed brown sugar. 1-1/2 cups rolled oats, 1-1/ cup sifted flour, and 1/2 tsp salt, mix well. Cut in 3/4 cup shortening with 2 knives or pastry blender until it has the consistency of coarse crumbs. Spread half the mixture into a greased pan, combine 2 cups minced meat, and 1/2 tsp each lemon and orange flavoring. Spread over first mixture in pan. Top with remaining flour mixture. Bake 20-25 minus. Cool slightly and cut in squares. Makes about 16 squares.

Saturday, September 26, 2020

Vintage 1960s Automobiles The Chevrolet Corvair

 



Automobiles

The Chevrolet Corvair

 

Manufactured by Chevrolet for model years 1960–1969, is still the only American-designed, mass-produced passenger car with a rear-mounted, air-cooled engine. 

Initially, the innovative Corvair was manufactured and marketed as a 4-door sedan.

The compact Chevrolet Corvair was designed to compete with Volkswagens in the US market.



The 1960 Corvair went on sale on October 2, 1959, and was the first American compact sedan with a rear-mounted, air-cooled engine, unit-body construction, three-across seating, and the availability of an automatic transmission. Only four-door sedans were available at first, then came the 2-door coupe, convertible, 4-door station wagon, passenger van, commercial van, and pickup truck body styles.

Though inspired by Volkswagen’s four-cylinder engine, Chevrolet engineers used Porsche engines as a guide.

To stay competitive with the VW Beetle, the new Ford Falcon, and Plymouth Valiant, Chevrolet chose to cut corners right where it showed: on the interior. The base model 500 was particularly drab. Everything inside was gray, both the fabric and vinyl upholstery and black rubber floor mats. The 700 models came with three interior colors from which to choose. Extra-cost options on both the 700 and 500 models included things we take for granted today, like sun visors for both driver and passenger, armrests, or a cigarette lighter.



The Corvair sales took a significant upturn when the Monza coupe debuted at the 1960 Chicago Auto Show. Though the Monza would rewrite what everyone's idea of a Corvair was an alternative to the typical front-engined American family cars of the period.

The death knell for the Corvair came when Ralph Nader’s 1965 book “Unsafe at Any Speed” claimed that the car’s design that incorporated swing-axle suspension created a far greater risk of the vehicle rolling, which he described as 'the one-car accident.' Even though the suspension had been redesigned for much better handling and safety, the damage was done. Nader’s book became a best-seller, but in the consumer’s mind, the reputation of the Corvair was tarnished forever.  Chevrolet ceased production of the Corvair with the 1969 model.

 

 

 

Saturday, September 19, 2020

Vintage 1960s Food Zucchini Bread

 


Breakfast

          Tang was all the rage in the early 1960s thanks to its use by the space program, while other popular new products introduced during this decade included Pop-Tarts and Carnation Instant Breakfast. Towards the end of the decade, healthy and natural breakfast foods including granola, whole-grain toast, herbal tea, and zucchini bread began to catch on thanks to the influence of the Hippies.

 

Zucchini Bread

 

1 1/2 cup all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1/2 cup margarine, softened

3/4 cups granulated sugar

1 egg

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 1/2 cup shredded zucchini

1/2 cup chopped walnuts

1/2 cup raisins

Preheat oven to 350°. Spray 9 x 5-inch loaf pan with no-stick spray; set aside.

 

Combine flour, baking soda, cinnamon, salt, and nutmeg in medium bowl; set aside. Beat margarine with sugar in a large bowl with electric mixer on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Beat in egg and vanilla until blended. Beat in zucchini.

 

Gradually beat in flour mixture until blended. Stir in walnuts and raisins. Spoon batter into prepared pan.

Bake 50 to 55 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. Cool 10 minutes on wire rack; remove from pan and cool completely. Served with melted butter.

Servings 4-6


Saturday, September 12, 2020

Vintage 1960 Women's Clothes

 

 

In the 1960s, Women's wear followed three broad trends: a continuation of the previous year’s ladylike elegance, the youthful styles, the Space Age influence, and the late 1960s “hippie” style. It was a decade that broke many fashion traditions, mirroring social movements during the time.

Here are just a few of the influential fashion designers of the 1960s. They set the trends for the mainstream and interpretations of their designs are easy to spot if you know what to look for.

 

Meet the influencers behind the sixties' fashions:

 


BIBA

Founded by, Polish-born, Barbara Hulanicki, in the 1960s, the lines (which eventually included makeup) were aimed mostly at teenagers and consisted of what we refer to as today's high street fashion. Her color palette was softened colors of brown, reddish-brown, grey, and plum. Best known for:  Mini-skirts, Long tight sleeves, Maxi skirts, Catsuits, gingham print dresses, and triangular headscarves.

 


GIVENCHY

Hubert de Givenchy's creations were refined and helped to define the 1960s style of chic and classy dressing of movie stars. The actress, Audrey Hepburn, was dressed in Givenchy's clothes on and off-screen. Givenchy's most famed design was:  The little black dress, which Hepburn wore it in the movie, "Breakfast at Tiffany's"

 


ANDRÉ COURRÈGES

Courrèges was a fashion designer who made his debut n the Parisian fashion world of 1960 with his futuristic, youthful but  "high fashion" label. His fashion creations included: Triangle shaped shift dress, Halter top, Short skirts, Hip-hugger pants, White mid-calf boots, Vinyl trimmed coats and suits, and Cigarette pantsuits.

 


PIERRE CARDIN

He was the originator of the fifties bubble dresses. Italian born, he is also famous for innovative, contemporary designs that bordered on the unusual and futuristic in the 60s. He came up with the use of hammered metal jewelry, industrial zippers, and plastic in his creations. His styles included:  Thigh-high boots, Collarless jackets, Bright colored min-shift dresses, The Unisex cosmos suit, Skinny double-breasted suits, and Space-age designs.

 


YVES SAINT LAURENT

Algeria born, he has had a great impact on the European fashion industry.

He contributed to many of the sixties fashion trends. Some of his most popular clothing styles include the Mondrian shift dress, Peacoat, Safari jacket, Women tuxedos, Sheer blouse, Jumpsuit, and Women smoking jackets

 


EMILIO PUCCI

Known as the, "The Prince of Print" his designs were recognized for his

trademark "psychedelic look"- electric colors. Fashionable women and important personalities such as Jackie Kennedy, Sophia Loren, and Marilyn Monroe wore this styles. Best known for:   Palazzo pantsuits, Silk headscarves, Body-hugging mini-skirts, Silk jersey clothing, Cropped Capri Pants, Space-age inspired air hostess uniforms.

 

 


MARY QUANT

The "Quant Look" contained the silhouette mini skirt or mini shift dress, patent leather boots, colored opaque tights, a bob style haircut, prominent and dark eye makeup and false lashes. Her designs included the following:  Colorful raincoats, Boots with detachable tops, Mix and match separates, Tight mini-skirts, hot pants, Lounging pajamas, and Dresses/skirts with matching colorful tights.