Friday, November 29, 2019

Vintage 1950s Food



Something Special for the Holidays

Here's a deviled egg recipe from the 1950s. Oh...so many memories of family holiday dinners!!
Stuffed Deviled Eggs
4 hard-cooked eggs
1 tbsp. Heinz Sweet or India Relish
1 tbsp. Heinz Tomato Ketchup
1 tbsp. mayonnaise or salad dressing
1/2 tsp. Heinz Prepared Mustard
Salt & pepper to taste
Remove the shells from the eggs. Cut eggs lengthwise; remove yolks. Mash yolks; blend with remaining ingredients. Refill egg whites with mixture. Chill. Makes 8 deviled eggs.
Note: You can fill the egg whites with a spoon, or you can fill them using a pastry bag and a star-shaped tip. They look like Christmas trees by adding green or red food coloring to the mixture.


Thursday, November 21, 2019

Vintage 1950s Food



Something special for the holidays

Tuna Fritters

2 cups all-purpose biscuit mix
1 teaspoon seasoned salt
1 egg
2/3 cup (small can) undiluted evaporated milk
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1-1/2 cups tuna (or diced, cooked ham)
2 tablespoons finely chopped onion
2 tablespoons finely chopped green pepper
2 tablespoons chopped parsley
1/2 cup chopped celery
Fat or oil for frying
Directions
Blend biscuit mix, seasoned salt, egg, evaporated milk and lemon juice in a bowl. Add remaining ingredients and blend well. Drop from teaspoon into deep hot fat (375 degrees F) or into 1/2 inch hot fat in a frying pan. Fry 1-1/2 to 2 minutes. Turn and fry on the other side. Drain on paper towel. Serve at once with cheese sauce.

3 Minute Cheese Sauce
1-2/3 cups ( 1 large can) Carnation undiluted evaporated milk
1/2 t salt
2 cups grated American cheese
Simmer evaporated milk and salt in a sauce pan to just about boiling (about 2 minutes). Add cheese and stir until thickened and smooth (about 1 minute)
Note: The sauce can be used on baked potatoes, hamburgers, fries, etc.


Friday, November 15, 2019

Vintage 1950s Food


The 1950s were all about having hor's d' oeuvres or what my family called snacks: before and after a meal. When we came home from school in New York, my mother always has something interesting for the 3:00 snack. This was a wonderful late school year snack when it was getting to be summer and throughout summer.

Gazpacho Snack

1/3 cup chopped cucumber
1/4 cup chopped green pepper
2 tbsp. chopped onion
2 tbsp. plain yogurt
2 tsp. wine vinegar
1/8 tsp. garlic powder
1/8 tsp. ground red pepper
9 cherry tomatoes, each cut into 4 slices
36 Low Salt Ritz Crackers

In a small bowl, stir together cucumber, green pepper, onion, yogurt, vinegar, garlic powder, and red pepper until blended. Place a tomato slice on each Ritz cracker. Top with 1/2 teaspoon vegetable mixture. Serve immediately.
Makes 3 doz. appetizers

Friday, November 8, 2019

Vintage 1950s Cars


Vintage 1950s Cars

Dodge Coronet, 1956

          The Coronet was an automobile that was marketed by Dodge as a full-size car in the 1950s, initially the division's highest trim line but, starting in 1955, the lowest trim line. From the 1965 to 1975 model years the name was on intermediate-sized models. A coronet is a small crown consisting of ornaments fixed on a metal ring

          The 1955 Coronet dropped to the lower end of the Dodge vehicle lineup, with the Wayfarer and Meadowbrook names no longer used and the Custom Royal added above the RoyalLancer, and La Femme. Bodies were restyled with help from newly hired Virgil Exner to be lower, wider, and longer than the lumpy prewar style, which in turn generated a healthy boost in sales over 1954.

          1956 was the last year of this body style before the change in 1957, the only differences offered in 1956 from the previous year were trim packages and the new Dodge D-500. suspension. Under the hood, the engine received larger valves, a full-race camshaft, and a double log intake manifold that used two four-barrel Carter WCFB carburetors and a shaved deck for 8.25:1 compression. This all added up to 285 bhp. It was the fastest car from the factory that year.

          1976 was the final model year for the Dodge Coronet, at least so far as the name Coronet was concerned. There were two body styles offered,  only two four-door models, the four-door wagon. and the four-door sedan. The former Dodge Coronet 2-door model was replaced by the Dodge Charger Sport 2-door model.

Thursday, October 31, 2019

Vintage 1950s Men's Fashion


Vintage 1950s
Men’s Plain Dress Shirts

          In the early years, men’s dress shirts were dull and plain just like the grey flannel suits. White, blue, light pink, mustard yellow, light green, light grey colors in smooth finishes complemented the suits. They fit rather wide and baggy (no modern trim fits yet) with a single cuff. Cufflinks were optional but generally too fussy for this simple look. Most men’s dress shirts had a single breast pocket.

          The most popular shirt collars started out as straight pointed collars with or without buttons. As tie widths and knot shapes moved from narrow to wide to ultra-skinny over the decade, so too did the collars. A straight spread collar accommodated most of the 1950s ties that had a wide tie knot. Narrow straight collars went with standard 3 inch or ultra-skinny 2-inch ties.

          There were also a few years when the round collar or “club” collar tie came back in fashion from the turn of the century.  Collar pins also came back in style for more conservative dressers and added a nice upscale touch to point collars.  Almost all collars shortened during the decade. Most of today’s men’s shirts resemble those from the 1950s.


Friday, October 25, 2019

Vintage 1950s Movies


Vintage 1950s
Movies
African Queen
The African Queen was released December 23, 1951. It is a British-American adventure film adapted from a 1935 novel by C.S. Forester. It was photographed in Technicolor. The film stars Humphrey Bogart (who won the Academy Award for Best Actor – his only Oscar), and Katharine Hepburn with Robert Morley, Peter Bull, Walter Gotell, Richard Marner and Theodore Bikel.
          The African Queen was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry in 1994, with the Library of Congress deeming it "culturally, historically or aesthetically significant".
          In 1951, two of the world's most beloved — and highest-paid — movie stars, Katharine Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart filmed in sweltering jungles around the Belgian Congo (today is known as the Democratic Republic of the Congo) spending seven weeks filming a WWI-era romantic-comedy-adventure film about a hard-drinking riverboat captain, Charlie Allnut (Bogart), and his burgeoning love affair with a prim Christian missionary, Rose Sayer (Hepburn).
          

The shoot was often a grueling experience for the crew, particularly 
Hepburn, who suffered from dysentery caused by contaminated water. She refused to let it affect her work and never missed a day of filming. Unlike Hepburn and much of the crew, both Bogart and Huston remained healthy throughout the shoot.

Saturday, October 19, 2019

Vintage 1950s Toys


Vintage 1950s
Toys
Pogo Stick
         
          The modern pogo stick was invented by Max Pohlig and Ernst Gottschall, from Germany. A German patent was registered in Hanover on March 1920 for a device they called a "spring end hopping stilt". It is thought that the beginning two letters in these men's last names is where the word "pogo" comes from.
          The two-handle pogo stick design was patented by George B. Hansburg in 1957. Hansburg described the origins of the Pogo name colloquially in a story of a young Burmese girl with the aforementioned name whose father had created a crude version of the device so that the daughter could travel to the local temple for prayers. An earlier design with a single upright vertical handle patented in 1955 posed something of a risk to the user's chin. Later, improvements to the pogo stick have been made, including the VurtegoFlybar, and the BowGo, which allow operators to jump much higher than with a simple coil spring pogo stick. Backflips and other tricks are now possible on some of these newer sticks, which has contributed to the growth of the new sport of Extreme Pogo ("Xpogo").
          Whatever improvements or different types are made, the basic design idea of a person riding on a spring remains the same.
          Extreme Pogo, or Xpogo, is an action sport which involves riding and performing tricks on extreme pogo sticks, defined by their durability and potential for height. Today's Xpogo sticks have the potential for over 10 ft. of height (measured from the ground to the bottom of the tip). Extreme pogo is a relatively new extreme sport and is currently emerging into popular culture as evidenced by the growing number of Xpogo athletes around the globe.